Kingsland Cup and Prize Moot

The competition takes place over three rounds: the first round sees entrants judged on the quality of their skeleton arguments; the semi-finals are oral moots held before distinguished puisne and Court of Appeal judges; and the final of the competition is a moot heard before a current or retired Supreme Court judge (frequently, before his untimely death, Lord Kerr of Tonaghmore), and/or a panel of senior barristers, judges, and legal academics. 

Read more about Lord Kingsland and the history of the moot here.

The Moot Rules can be read here, which should be read carefully.

Please direct all queries relating to the Kingsland Cup and Prize Moot to the Moot Coordinators, Brendan Brett and Michael Feeney, at kingslandcup@ftbchambers.co.uk – please do not contact the clerks.

Although we are unable to provide feedback to individual entrants, the Moot Masters have produced a short note setting out general comments, pointers on common mistakes, and top tips for moot entries in the future. Those unsuccessful in progressing to the second round this year are encouraged to enter again next year, if they remain eligible.

The FTB Kingsland Cup and Moot Prize competition has been running annually since 2011. Below is a list of all previous winners.

Entries for the 2023/204 Kingsland Cup and Prize Moot are now open. The problem can be found here. The entry form, which must be completed by both leading and junior counsel, can be found here. The deadline for submissions is 2 February 2024 at 4pm. Entrants are requested to read the moot rules carefully, as late or non-complaint entries will not be accepted. 

The indicative dates for the remainder of the 2023/204 competition are as follows: 

Week commencing 4 March 2024: Semi-final Round moots
Week commencing 8 April 2024: Publication of Final Round problem 
Week commencing 24 June 2024: Deadline for Submission of Final Round skeleton arguments 
Week commencing 8 July 2024: Final  Round moot 

The Grand Final of the Kingsland Cup and Prize Moot, was held on 10 July 2023 in the Old Court Room of Lincoln's Inn.  It was judged by Sir Keith Lindblom, Senior President of Tribunals. Iason Pafitis and Ruari Clarke (City Law School) were the winners. The runners-up were Henry Screaton and Alex Miller (City Law School).

The final round problem can be found here.

The semi-final moots were held on 7 March 2023, judged by Mr Justice Peter Lane and Mrs Justice Bacon. 

The first round moot problem can be found here and the rules can be found here.

The Grand Final took place on 4 July 2022 at the Royal Courts of Justice.  It was judged by Sir Keith Lindblom, Senior President of Tribunals and Professor Alison Young, Sir David Williams Professor of Public Law at the University of Cambridge.  

The winners were Joshua Neaman and Bethany Hermanszewska.  The runners-up were John Choi and Daniel Leyva.

The winners were Joshua Neaman and Bethany Hermanszewska (pictured).  The runners-up were John Choi and Daniel Leyva.

Final judged by Sir Keith Lindblom, Senior President of Tribunals and Professor Alison Young, Sir David Williams Professor of Public Law at the University of Cambridge.

Moot Problem 2021-2022

Final Round Moot Problem 2021-2022

2021-22: Joshua Neaman and Bethany Hermanszewska (City Law School)
2020-21: Lois Lane and Tom Lambert (City Law School) 
2019-20: Jack Stuart and Jack Moore (Nottingham Law School) 
2018-19: Jessica Allen and Richard Mahal (City Law School)
2017-18: Jared Kang and Rabin Kok (University of Cambridge)
2016-17: Harriet Fitzsimons and Sarah-Jane Ewart (City Law School)
2015-16: Esther Drabkin-Reiter and Ryan Ferro (City Law School)
2014-15: Rachael Muldoon and Ng Lee Vin (BPP Law School)
2013-14: Victoria Brown and Daira Popescu (Kaplan Law School)
2012-13: Martin Edwards and Joel McMillian (BPP Law School)
2011-12: Julia Petrenko and Grace Hansen (Kaplan Law School)